Sofia Cumming | Associate Postgraduate

Critical Thinking in the Plural. Conceptual Approaches in Research in the Social Sciences
Centre Marc Bloch, Friedrichstraße 191, D-10117 Berlin
Email: S.Cumming  ( at )  uea.ac.uk Tel: +49(0) 30 / 20 93 70700

Home Institution : University of East Anglia, Norwich (UK) | Disciplines : Literature , German studies , Philosophy , Vergleichende Literatur |

Biography

Sofia Cumming is a PhD candidate working in the fields of Comparative Literature and modern European intellectual history at the School of Literature, Drama & Creative Writing at the University of East Anglia (Norwich, UK). Since 2018, she has acted as an Associate Tutor and Guest Lecturer for her department, where she has taught undergraduate courses on Critical Theory, Literary Criticism and Modernism. Sofia is currently a visiting doctoral researcher at Humboldt-Universität Berlin. She holds a BA (Hons) in Comparative Literature from the University of Kent (2011-2015) and a Master of Studies in Modern Languages from the University of Oxford (2015-2016). 

Title of thesis

Walter Benjamin's Parisian Passages - Correspondences in European Thought

Institution of thesis

University of East Anglia

Supervisor

Prof. Duncan Large

Organisation of Events

May 2019: Benjamin’s Baudelaire – Constellations of Modernity, A Workshop for Early Career Researchers, Centre for Philosophy & Critical Thought, Goldsmiths, University of London

May 2019: Berlin Childhood around 1900: A Film Project in Progress by Aura Rosenberg and Frances Scholz, Public screening event + Q&A, Goldsmiths, University of London

Walter Benjamin's Parisian Passages - Correspondences in European Thought

Sofia Cumming's doctoral thesis focuses on the life and work of German-Jewish writer, philosopher and critic, Walter Benjamin. It takes an analysis of Benjamin’s engagement with French literature, as well as research into his Parisian exile and interactions with notable French intellectuals, as the foundation from which to explore the post-war reception of his philosophy in France. From a wider angle, the project aims to examine the history of Franco­-German cultural and intellectual relations throughout the twentieth century and the ways in which philosophies from both nations were exchanged, inherited and developed. Reconciling Marxist and Surrealist analytical frameworks, it ultimately seeks to contribute to a recontextualization of Benjamin’s role as an innovator of both form and content within twentieth-century critical theory.